Eric Lefkofksy is revolutionizing the ways in which oncologists treat cancer

Eric Lefkofsky is best known as the founder of volume discount juggernaut Groupon, an innovative company that allows consumers to form temporary buyer’s coalitions that enable them to get deep volume discounts on their favorite goods. The company has brought billions of dollars to businesses across the globe. It has saved customers even more and more information click here.

But recently, Lefkofsky has embarked on an even greater challenge. Through his latest startup, Tempus, he is seeking to completely transform the ways in which physicians interact with data, allowing for levels of real-time medical analysis that have never before been dreamed of.

Tempus is marrying the power of machine learning with the vast new wealth of data created by such technologies as gene sequencing. In fact, Lefkofsky predicts that, within 10 years, almost everyone will have their entire genome sequenced. This is a direct result of the extreme diminution of cost involved with such an undertaking. Since 2003, the year that the first entire human genome was sequenced, the cost of committing to computer code a person’s entire DNA architecture has dropped from well over $100 million down to just under $5,000. This incredible pace of cost-cutting hasn’t slackened much, either. By 2030, Lefkofksy predicts, the cost of sequencing a person’s full genome will drop to below $100 and learn more about Eric.

What this will do, says Lefkofsky, is create a trove of actionable medical intelligence, the likes of which have never before been seen. The ability of doctors to have, at their fingertips, the entire genomes of every patient who has suffered from a given disease, undergone a given treatment or taken a given drug will allow for an explosion of nuanced understanding in how best to optimize treatment protocols for a patient. In fact, Lefkofksy predicts that in the future, medical treatments will be tailored to the precise genomic makeup of the patient. This will even extend to drugs, which may be synthesized on the spot, leading to different patients with, nominally, the same disease being given radically different courses of treatment, all optimized for their particular genomic makeup and Eric’s lacrosse camp.

Such possibilities are, to say the least, exciting.

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